Your Page Title

They came to India after fleeing various atrocities, now they got citizenship and got a sigh of relief.


New Delhi: Delhi’s Adarsh ​​Nagar and Majnu Ka Tila, these two places inside the country’s capital are where refugees from neighboring country Pakistan live. Till now, the Hindu people who came from there were living like foreigners in these refugee camps, but now these will become their permanent homes. This is because 14 people – 9 from Adarsh ​​Nagar Camp and 5 from Majnu Ka Tila – were granted Indian citizenship under the Citizenship Amendment Act on Wednesday. No one can even imagine what atrocities they faced in Pakistan. Now that he got Indian citizenship, there is a different feeling of happiness on his face. After more than a decade of not being citizens of any country, the residents of these camps were overjoyed to see their dreams come true. After the central government implemented the CAA on March 12, the first set of certificates granting Indian citizenship was distributed to migrants on Wednesday. Madhav, Chandrakala, Bawana and Lakshmi were among those who received citizenship papers on Wednesday. He is a respected resident of Adarsh ​​Nagar Camp. Let us read this story in his own words.

Never went to school but daughter’s future will be good

Lakshmi’s father was concerned about the safety of his family and feared forced conversion of his two daughters. For this reason, in 2013 he escaped from Mirpur Khas, Pakistan. His family had come to India on pilgrimage and some relatives in Gujarat gave them shelter for a short time. Later he came to know that Pakistani Hindu families also live in Delhi, so he left Gujarat and started living in Adarsh ​​Nagar camp with the help of some local leaders. It was here that Lakshmi got married to another man who had come from Pakistan. Now he also has a one year old daughter. An overjoyed Lakshmi showed her citizenship certificate and said that when I came to India, I was 12 or 13 years old and had never gone to school. I am happy that my daughter’s future will be better. She will be able to go to school without any fear and will also be able to take advantage of government schemes.

​Becoming an Indian is like getting new wings

​Becoming an Indian is like getting new wings

Jhule Ram remembers that in 2009-10, he moved from Hyderabad to a small village in Sindh due to religious tension in his area. But he did not get relief even in the village. This was the time when his family decided to leave Pakistan. After crossing the border in 2013 at the age of 17, Ram quickly learned the worldly thing and today sells mobile phone accessories and cold drinks near Majnu Ka Tila. After getting citizenship along with his brother Harsh Kumar and uncle Sheetal Das, he happily said that becoming an Indian was like getting new wings. Some members of his family are also waiting for a similar change. The best advantage of getting citizenship is that now new paths have opened for us. We can now leave the camp and settle in the city, where there are better opportunities for education and business.

It is difficult to imagine the difficulties

It is difficult to imagine the difficulties

Perhaps he longed for India or had a vision of the future, Dayal Das named his son born 23 years ago Bharat. Today, this sharecropper farmer, his wife and their children Yashoda (25) and Bharat are all Indian citizens. He came to India 23 years ago on a pilgrimage from Hyderabad, Sindh with the help of a visa and later stayed here after getting his visa extended. Dayal laughingly said that everyone knows why we left Pakistan. Our life there was full of uncertainty. Due to difficulties my children could not study, but I hope that my grandchildren will live a life with dignity. Dayal Das is also ready to help Pakistani Hindu people, so that they can do the necessary paperwork to get Indian citizenship.

​My parents took a very right decision

​My parents took a very right decision

It is written in Bavanna’s citizenship certificate that she came to India from Wagah Border on 22 March 2014, at that time she was eight years old. She now has vague memories of the village of Tando Allah Yar in Pakistan, where she was born, but she does remember how she had to wear a burqa to school with her elder sister and that being a Hindu, Even drinking water from the school hand pump was prohibited. Bawna, one of the youngest to receive citizenship, has recently passed her Class 10 CBSE board exam with 70% marks from Government Girls Senior Secondary School, Majlis Park. She says that unlike in Pakistan, she never faced discrimination in her school in Delhi. I wish that my relatives who remained in Pakistan could also get the education that I got. Our parents had taken the right decision to come to India.

​Finding happiness in the happiness of others

​Finding happiness in the happiness of others

Brahm Das has not yet received Indian citizenship, but his neighbors in the camp celebrated when he received his citizenship certificate. Brahm’s family came to Majnu ka Tila camp in 2013 along with 60 other migrants from Matiyari district of Sindh. He said that I have done all the necessary paperwork and I hope that my citizenship letter will arrive soon. Those who have got Indian citizenship are very lucky. They and their future generations will live in a country that gives them respect and opportunity. Ask those who remain there, what it feels like to be deprived of economic and social rights. Although Brahm also hopes to take the oath of becoming an Indian citizen soon, he has to face the hardships faced by many of his relatives living in Matiyari and elsewhere in Sindh. Keep worrying about relatives. He told that we continuously receive horrifying news of atrocities there.

Share on:

Leave a Comment